SEDAS – Essential Maintenance

SEDAS – Essential Maintenance

Please be advised that the SEDAS Portal essential maintenance downtime has been scheduled for 17:00 GMT Tuesday 28 February until 18:00 GMT Tuesday 28 February 2017.

Apologies for any inconvenience caused.

If you have any questions or feedback, please do not hesitate to contact us by emailing sedas@sa.catapult.org.uk

Kind regards,

SEDAS Team

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SEDAS users set to benefit from availability of Sentinel-2 data through platform

SEDAS users set to benefit from availability of Sentinel-2 data through platform

Following the recent launch of the new Sentinel Data Access Service (SEDAS), Sentinel-2 data is now available through the online data hub, providing users with invaluable new data.

SEDAS, which is jointly funded by the UK Space Agency and the Satellite Applications Catapult, was launched earlier this year as a new online data hub to enable UK end-users to access Copernicus Earth observation data.

Sentinel-2 provides wide-area, high-resolution, multispectral imagery which will benefit efforts to tackle deforestation, food security, disaster monitoring and coastal pollution. The satellite provides global coverage of the Earth’s land surface every ten days, making the data of great […] Read more

SEDAS – Essential Maintenance

SEDAS – Essential Maintenance

Please be advised that the SEDAS Portal essential maintenance downtime has been rescheduled to 17:00 GMT Friday 4 November 2016 until 08:00 GMT Monday 7 November 2016.

Apologies for any inconvenience caused.

If you have any questions or feedback, please do not hesitate to contact us by emailing sedas@sa.catapult.org.uk

Kind regards,

SEDAS Team

[…] Read more

Copernicus Sentinel-1A Satellite Hit by Space Particle

Copernicus Sentinel-1A Satellite Hit by Space Particle

ESA engineers have discovered that a solar panel on the Copernicus Sentinel-1A satellite was hit by a millimetre-size particle in orbit on 23 August. Thanks to onboard cameras, ground controllers were able to identify the affected area. So far, there has been no effect on the satellite’s routine operations.

A sudden small power reduction was observed in a solar array of Sentinel-1A, orbiting at 700 km altitude, at 17:07 GMT on 23 August. Slight changes in the orientation and the orbit of the satellite were also measured at the same time.

For more information on this news story, please visit: www.esa.int

 

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Satellite built in Guildford used to monitor disasters locations

Satellite built in Guildford used to monitor disasters locations

This video demonstrates how a satellite built in Guildford is used to create data for agriculture, forestry and disaster monitoring across the world.

UK-DMC2 was launched seven years ago and has since been orbiting the planet collecting infrared data for Earth observation.

The satellite was built by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd and is operated by UK-DMC International Imaging (DMCii), both of which are based across the road from each other at the Surrey Research Park in Guildford.

It is part of the Disaster Monitoring Constellation and one of its uses is to provide “rapid response imagery” in the event of catastrophic events.

For more […] Read more

First Satellite-Based Wildlife Monitoring Tool for Airports

First Satellite-Based Wildlife Monitoring Tool for Airports

Wildlife habitats close to airports pose a serious risk to safety at takeoff and landing. Thanks to ESA, a new service lets airports use satellites to identify and manage these areas.

Developed by Ascend XYZ in Denmark with ESA’s help, the service uses free images and data from Earth observation satellites combined with smart software.

Several airports in Denmark have tested the Ascend software and found it far easier to use than existing complicated standalone systems.

For more information on this news story, please visit: www.esa.int 

 

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Sentinel-1 Provides New Inights into Italy’s Earthquake

Sentinel-1 Provides New Inights into Italy’s Earthquake

On 24 August, an earthquake struck central Italy, claiming at least 290 lives and causing widespread damage. Satellite images are being used to help emergency aid organisations, while scientists have begun to analyse ground movement.

he Italian peninsula is prone to earthquakes because of the continuing collision of the African and Eurasian tectonic plates. Under the Apennine mountain chain, the regional collision is causing the African slab to flex and dip under the Tyrrhenian Sea, while at the same time retreating northeastwards.

The slab’s retreat is the main process driving the present tectonic extension which causes earthquakes like this one and the 2009 […] Read more

Flex Takes on Mutants

Flex Takes on Mutants

Because a plant isn’t green doesn’t mean it can’t photosynthesise as well as its more usual counterpart, but when measured by satellites, these non-green varieties skew results on plant health. FLEX is different. Experiments using ‘mutants’ show that colour won’t be an obstacle in this new mission’s task of mapping plant health from space.

Planned to be launch around 2022, ESA’s Fluorescence Explorer – FLEX – will use a novel technique to track the health of the world’s vegetation.

For more information on this news story, please visit: www.esa.int

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Earth observation data: Multibillion-dollar opportunity — or dud?

VCs are getting serious about space-related startups, and there are some truly exponential growth opportunities in the SpaceTech ecosystem.

But the majority of money that went into SpaceTech last year was in just two deals — a $1 billion fundraise for SpaceX and a $500 million raise for OneWeb. If you ignore those as outliers, SpaceTech funding in 2015 was only around $300 million. Not so epic.

The segment of startups seeing the most VC attention is the earth observation (EO) segment. Companies building earth observation (EO) satellite constellations (basically, cameras put into orbit and photographing the Earth on a regular basis) […] Read more

Radar remote sensing satellite launched by China

A Long March 4C rocket took off from northern China on Tuesday and deployed a radar imaging satellite into orbit about 460 miles above Earth to survey the oceans, crops and resources, and natural disasters.

The three-stage launcher thundered away from the Taiyuan space center 2255 GMT (6:55 p.m. EDT) Tuesday, Chinese state media reported, then turned south to place the Gaofen 3 spacecraft into polar orbit.

Liftoff occurred at 6:55 a.m. Beijing time Wednesday.

Tracking data published by the U.S. military’s Joint Space Operations Center indicated the Long March 4C rocket placed the Gaofen 3 satellite into orbit at an altitude of […] Read more